You May Have A “Dream” Solution To Your Auto Repair Problem

What can I do about a bad mechanic?

What is a Defective Mechanic Work Lawsuit?

Individuals may bring their automobile to a mechanic for repairs. Repairs are needed for many reasons. Individuals may sue the mechanic for defective mechanic work. Defective mechanic work, also called faulty repair work, occurs when a mechanic negligently makes repairs that result in vehicle damage or injury to people.

What is Defective Mechanic Work?

To repair a vehicle, mechanics may fix, adjust, replace, or remove one or more parts. A mechanic must perform repairs using a reasonable standard of care. This means the mechanic may not act negligently. To make repairs under a reasonable standard of care, a mechanic must use the standard knowledge, skills, professionalism, and “know-how” expected of a mechanic.

To act with skill and professionalism in making repairs, a mechanic must (among other things):

  • Ensure that a vehicle brought in for inspection is repaired so it is safe for driving;
  • Replace, remove, adjust, or upgrade parts, with the skill expected of a mechanic making such repairs;
  • Make only repairs that are necessary; and
  • Make only those repairs that a customer authorized.

What is “Reasonable”?

What is “reasonable” in “reasonable standard of care” depends upon the circumstances. If a person brings a vehicle to a mechanic for repairs covered by a warranty, the mechanic must use the skill and care required to make warranty repairs. If a person brings an electric or hybrid vehicle to a mechanic for repairs, the mechanic must use the knowledge and skill that a mechanic who repairs such vehicles is expected to use.

 

The Mechanic Damaged My Vehicle – What Can I Do?

Question: I took my car in for service and when it was returned, my transmission was no longer working properly. The mechanic said that he didn’t do anything to it, but the vehicle was working perfectly when I left it at his place of business. I am not sure what type of lawyer I need or what I can do about the situation.

First, the type of lawyer that you may need depends on the type of claim that you would like to file. A lawyer can walk you through each possible cause of action and the legal elements that you must establish. If you were to file a lawsuit, you would be known as the plaintiff and you would have the burden of proving the legal elements of your case.

One type of claim that may be available based on your circumstances is a breach of contract. If the mechanic was contracted to perform the work in a skillful manner and he did not, you may be able to sue on these grounds. If the service was provided as part of a warranty on the vehicle, you may have a breach of warranty case. The legal complication of this issue may be that you may not have a contract for the transmission work. Therefore, the mechanic may not have breached his duty if he performed the other work correctly.

Another possible cause of action is negligence. This legal theory is based on the idea that the mechanic owed you a duty to properly repair your vehicle and that by messing up the transmission, he breached the duty. The other elements that you have to prove are causation and damages. Based on your description, damages should be relatively clear as they will amount to the money that you will have to spend to get the transmission fixed.

The biggest legal complication that you are likely to encounter is to prove causation. Your theory will be that the mechanic caused the damage to the vehicle. Based on your description, it sounds like the mechanic will say that he did not do the damage. He may even say that the damage had to be there before you brought the vehicle in, but you may not have been aware of it. Remember, you have the burden of showing the court that the mechanic actually caused this damage. Therefore, you will likely need more than just your word to prove this series of events. For example, you may need to have another mechanic inspect the vehicle and write down his or her observations and opinion about what caused the transmission problem. If you decide to go to court, you will likely need the mechanic to appear in court to provide testimony as a written document of this nature may be considered hearsay.

 

Signs of a Bad Mechanic

Even if you buy a reliable car, change its oil regularly, and drive carefully, you can’t avoid visits to a mechanic. These repairmen have more training and tools to tackle automotive problems. Finding a trustworthy mechanic can be a challenge. But bad mechanics will do certain things that raise red flags. If you know the signs of a bad mechanic, you’ll be able to waste less of your time and money.

The mechanic isn’t certified

When asked to show proof of certification, a bad mechanic may become defensive and claim they have enough experience to keep you from pressing the issue.

The mechanic is inexperienced

If you take your car to a mechanic who has no idea what they’re doing, you will be charged extra for more hours of labor. A bad mechanic may claim it will take a few days to replace something simple like a tire rod, while it will only take an experienced mechanic an hour or two. Always check to find out how long a fix will take at another auto shop.

The mechanic won’t let you see the old parts

A bad mechanic will try to charge for work by “fixing” something that wasn’t broken in the first place. If you suspect this, always ask to see the old parts. A truthful mechanic will have no problem showing them to you.

The mechanic won’t admit to mistakes

Replacing parts or filters is a relatively routine task, but mistakes can still happen. It may be due to an issue outside of the mechanic’s control, but a good one will still take responsibility. A bad mechanic will pass the blame off instead of admitting they are at fault.

 

Discuss your concerns with your mechanic

If you are not happy with repair work:

  • speak with the repairer and give them a chance to explain and/or fix the problem. Do not just take your car to another repairer
  • mention the warranty on parts and repairs
  • consider that a problem may be unrelated to the work that was done
  • contact your insurance company, if the car is insured.

 

Times You Can Sue a Mechanic

Car repairs can be a scary prospect. First there’s the cost, the time it will take, and then the worry about the repairs being done right. Most mechanics do good and honest work, and care for our cars like they were their own. But other mechanics on the other hand…

So what happens if you get one of the bad guys? When can you sue a mechanic if they don’t take good care of your car?

  1. Bad Repairs

First and foremost, mechanics must do good work. You’re there to get a problem fixed, and if it is not fixed properly that could be dangerous for you and other drivers. Not to mention you shouldn’t be charged for non-existent or ineffective auto repairs. If a mechanic improperly installs a part, disables a safety device, otherwise fails to make adequate repairs to your vehicle, you may have a valid lawsuit.

  1. False Estimates or No Estimates

Most states have consumer protection laws that require auto repair shops to disclose details about repairs before they are done. Under these statutes, mechanics and other service providers must give you a detailed estimate of all work to be done, disclose whether used or rebuilt parts are being installed, and give you a quote for the costs. If your mechanic fails to give you an estimate of the work or fails to honor the estimate, you may want to call a lawyer.

  1. Breach of Warranty

Often we purchase new and used cars with warranties that cover certain service to the vehicle. These warranties generally come with stipulations regarding what repairs are covered, for how long, and may require you to use specific mechanics. If the mechanics don’t honor the warranty, either to repair the car or in covering the cost, you may need to sue.

  1. Fraud

Most of us have our guard up when we take our cars to a mechanic. The amount of stories we’ve heard about auto repair scams, coupled with our general unfamiliarity with the inner workings of our automobiles, means we’re already suspicious. But how do you know if your mechanic is taking you for a ride? Actually discovering fraud may be difficult, but if you discover your mechanic has charged you for service or parts he didn’t provide you may be able to sue for damages.

  1. Invalid Use of a Mechanic’s Lien

There are times when a repair person or company can place a lien on a customer’s property to pay for service or improvements done to the property. This is called a mechanic’s lien, and it is available not just to car mechanics, but to plumbers, painters, carpenters, and construction contractors and subcontractors — anyone who provides a service that improves a customer’s property.

How To Beat Car Dealer At Their Own Game

Rules for Buying a Cheap Car With Cash

Look for Cars That Have ‘Uglied Out

peeling paint and hail damage are all your friends when buying a used car. The more scuffed up the exterior looks, the more you can haggle the seller down on price. Remember, exterior flaws won’t impact what’s under the hood.

Follow the 10 years/100,000 Miles Rule

Ever heard Korean and Japanese manufacturers like Hyundai, Kia and Mitsubishi advertising their 10 year/100,000 mile auto warranties?

That’s the inspiration for a different rule you should follow if you only want to drop two or three Gs to buy a used car: Look for cars that are 10 model years old and have at least 100,000 miles on them. Think 100,000 miles is too much and that a car with that many miles is probably near the end of its useful life? Think again

Know Where to Look for Deals

When searching for cheap used cars online, check Craigslist, AutoTrader, iSeeCars, the Klipnik message boards and CarGurus. The latter site lets you put in your zip code and the make/model of the vehicle you’re interested in at their website. They’ll comb through some two million listings available on published databases and rate the vehicles available for sale with notations of ‘good deal,’ ‘fair deal,’ ‘high priced,’ ‘overpriced’ and so on.

Beware Those Beloved Nameplates

Honda and Toyota pretty routinely top the tally for car reliability that Consumer Reports does, which means there’s a premium on their resale value. If you’re looking to buy a cheap car, skip the Hondas and the Toyotas of the world. USA TODAY recommends you instead look at what are called ‘second-tier’ Japanese brands like Mazda, Nissan or Mitsubishi.

Buying a car: Things to know

Get financing:

When you go to a car dealership, you’re in a stronger position if you have a pre-approved loan. Unless your model has a special low-rate financing offer backed by the manufacturer, a local bank or credit union is likely to give you a better deal on a loan. And in most cases, you can take a rebate in place of any low-rate financing and use that to lower your purchase price.

usually is good for a month or more.

Credit unions typically charge 0.5% to 1% lower interest than bank car loans. You may have access to a credit union where you work, or may be eligible through a professional organization (teachers, government employees). If you don’t have ready access to a credit union, check out your local bank offerings. Websites specializing in loan information will give you a quick rundown on average rates and the best rates in your area.

Negotiate a price:

Before you head for the dealership, do your homework. Using websites like Edmunds.com or Kelley Blue Book, you can find out the manufacturer’s suggested retail price, or MSRP, and the dealer’s cost for any vehicle. You can also find out about customer or dealer rebates, subsidized lease deals, or other special breaks that can cut your cost. Pull together a folder showing your data and sources.

Focus any negotiation on that dealer cost. For an average car, 2% above the dealer’s invoice price is a reasonably good deal. A hot-selling car may have little room for negotiation, while you may be able to go even lower with a slow-selling model.

Salespeople will usually try to negotiate based on the MSRP. Try to focus the discussion away from the list price, to how much you intend to bid over the dealer’s invoice cost. Bring out your research. The salesperson may know less than you do since traditional dealer training focuses on the list price and many dealers do not give sales teams the invoice prices.

Buying a New Car vs Buying a Used Car

When it comes time to buy a car, you have a variety of choices available to you. Not only do you need to pick the make and model of your car, you also need to decide if you want to buy a new or used car. This is an important decision and it can make a big difference in your finances over the next several years. It is important to realize that buying a car is not an investment Your options may also be determined on whether or not you qualify for a loan or if you need pay in cash.

Advantages of a New Car

The advantage of buying a new car is that you are buying a car that generally comes with a warranty. Most new cars will have very few repairs in the first few years, so you can focus only on the maintenance of the car. The dealer may also offer financing at a lower interest rate, which can reduce the amount of interest you pay over the life of the loan. These are the most basic advantages.​

Disadvantages of a New Car

The biggest disadvantage of buying a new car is that you lose money on it as soon as you drive it off the lot. A new car takes its biggest depreciation in the first two or three years. This means that you are basically throwing away several thousand dollars that you will never be able to get back. Financially it does not make a lot of sense to buy a new car unless you have money you do not mind losing.

Advantages of a Used Car

The biggest advantage of buying a used car is that you let someone else take the biggest depreciation hit on the car. You may be able to sell your car for nearly the same amount you paid for it in the next few years. You can still find good financing options through your local bank or credit union, and because you are not losing the money on depreciation, you may come out ahead of a zero interest loan that you would take out on a new car.

Disadvantages of a Used Car

The biggest disadvantage of buying a used car is that it may not be as reliable or you may need to do more repairs on it. However, you do have the option of buying a Certified Pre-Owned car through several different car companies. As technology has improved cars have become more reliable and many models do not need repairs until they are well over 100,000 miles and close to ten years old. This means that you can buy a car that is three years old and sell it in five years and you may not need to do any major repairs on it. Plus, you can sell it at a price very close to what you bought it for. You may want to set aside a little bit of money each month to cover any car repairs that come up.

Who Has the Best Interest Rates: The Dealer or the Bank?

If you’re searching for a new or used car, chances are good that you’re planning on financing. The vast majority of new cars are financed, as the majority of drivers can’t afford — or don’t want — to pay for a new vehicle with cash. But before you sign the papers at the dealership, you might want to consider if you can get better interest rates and lower your payment by financing your next car through a bank or credit union

Who Offers a Lower Rate?

As a rule, there’s no telling whether the dealer will beat your bank’s rate, or vice versa. Remember: In most cases, dealer financing is also bank financing; the dealer is just doing the legwork by going to the bank on your behalf. So there’s no magic answer to the question of which one will have lower rates. That said, there are some pros and cons to choosing a dealer, and other pros and cons to choosing a bank. We’ve listed them to help you make the best decision possible

Dealer Financing: The Best Choice?

Many shoppers avoid the bank and just go through the dealer. It’s easier: They can show up, finance the car and drive away — all in the same day. But easier isn’t always better. After all, the dealer’s rates are marked up from the bank’s rates, and they have to be for the dealer to make any money. That means they may be higher. And since dealers send business to banks across the country, being late on a payment may mean talking to a bank located across the country — and they may not be willing to work with you, as your local bank might

Benefits of Your Bank

The bank holds a few benefits over the dealer. One is that the bank is nearby and you have a relationship. That means you have a better chance of getting the bank to work with you if you fall behind in your payments. That’s especially true if you finance through a small credit union or a local bank.

Our Suggestion

If you’re looking for your car, try this: Go to your bank first and see what their offer will be. Then visit the dealer. If they can match the bank’s rate, that’s great. If not, stick with the bank. Either way, you’ll have a great bargaining chip as you negotiate the car’s price.

Buying and running a car

Before you buy the car of your dreams, make sure you can afford all the costs. Learn about one-off and ongoing expenses, how to avoid sales pressure and get the best deal.

Costs of running a car

Before you buy a car, work out how much it costs to keep it on the road. It might be more than you think.

Car registration

Your car has to be registered before you can drive it, and you have to pay rego every year. How much you pay depends on where you live

Stamp duty

You have to pay stamp duty when you buy a new or used car. Each state and territory calculates stamp duty differently, so what you pay depends on where you live.

Insurance

You need basic insurance, called compulsory third party (CTP) insurance, to keep your car on the road. This is the minimum insurance you can have. You can also choose to get more third party or comprehensive insurance.

Contact Your Local Car Dealer

Factors to Consider When Choosing the Best Used Car Dealer

These days, many people are owning cars and there is a greater increase in the demand for a car as many people are seeing the advantages that come with having a personal car. There are many advantages that come with having your own car. You need to buy a good quality car that will serve you well from the many car dealers available. If you don’t have enough money then you can still be able to buy a car from the used car dealers that are found all around

The first tip that you will have to consider when you are choosing a used car dealer where you will be able to buy a car from is the reputation that they have. A good reputation means that the car dealer sells good cars and the clients are satisfied. You will get to know the reputation that a car dealer has by asking your friends and families. You can also be able to know the reputation of a car dealer by asking those people who have done business with that company in the past as well as checking online reviews on the dealer’s website.

The second tip that you will have to consider when you are choosing a used car dealer to buy a car from is the dealership policies. Some used car dealers will offer you 2 to 3 day of return policy in case you buy a car and later find it is not the right one for you. You also need to ensure that the car dealer as an exchange policy where you can be able to exchange the car after some time and get a better one that you want

You will have to consider the type of cars that the used car dealer sells. Do a research and ensure that the used cars burlington dealer has the type of car that you want to buy before you visit to buy a car. You can even Google the best type of car that will be able to fit your needs and ensure the dealer has them and ensure that the used car dealer has them before you visit the dealer for buying

When you are choosing a used car dealer that you will buy a car from you should ensure that all the cars that he sells are certified. Most of the used car dealers will be able to offer the certified vehicle program through their manufacturers in order to ensure that the cars will be worth paying the premiums for. There are a lot of benefits that come with buying a certified car from a used car dealer. The discussion above is about the tips that you need to consider when you are choosing a used car dealer to buy a car from

Qualities of Car Dealers

Buying a car is a sensitive decision that needs to be made with lots of planning. Otherwise, you might end up getting a raw deal. You will be left regretting if you buy a car that is not worth the cash that you spend.

Credibility

Don’t just pick the first car dealer you come across because the odds are that they might not be credible. You will notice that almost all car dealers have a website that sheds more light on their work and contacts.

Variety

You should buy your vehicle from a dealer that will give you unlimited opportunities. In simple terms, you should consider one with a huge inventory if you want to know what other cars they have to offer and the specs of the auto that you would like to purchase. Choosing such a dealer will make the process of buying your new or used wheels a breeze

Arranged Financing

Some cars are very expensive, and not everyone can afford to buy them in one installment. For this reason, excellent car dealers will arrange for the financing of the vehicle so that you can pay for it when driving it. However, you need to clearly understand every step of the financing process to avoid spending more than you intended. If you are not keen, you will get financing options that have lots of hidden charges.

Online Shopping

Shopping online has become a popular trend within the last two decades. It comes with multiple advantages when you are buying a car. For instance, you will be able to view the car images from different angles. That aside, you should not be fooled by the images

tips for buying your first car

Buying your first car can be exciting, but there’s a lot to manage. Planning ahead can help make the process easier—and help ensure you end up with the best car for you. Here are some important things to keep in mind as you start shopping for your first car.

Be honest about your needs

Do you need a car to get to class or work every day, or just for weekend adventures? What’s the weather like where you live—snowy, rainy or hot? Evaluate your lifestyle and the driving conditions you face most often. Do your research: Learn about different features and options, and how they might affect a car’s price

Think about your budget and financing

Take a realistic look at your finances, too. That includes not just the purchase price but budgeting for use and care of your future car, including maintenance, insurance, gas, repairs and parking. Learn more about the true cost of owning a car.

Explore your options

Shopping for your first car is a lot easier for you than it was for your parents. The Internet offers a wealth of sellers beyond your local area (who may ship cars to your area, which may come with a fee), which can mean more choices in your price range. You can research and narrow down the choices by looking at online auto rankings in categories like safety or auto type (such as SUVs, hybrids). Learn more about how to shop for—and even finance—a car online.

Know your credit score

Your credit score helps determine the interest rate you pay on a car loan. Better credit may help get you a more favorable interest rate, which in turn will affect your overall car-buying budget. You may also be able to get your credit score for free through your credit card provider.

Things to Avoid When Buying a Used Car

Buying a used car can be a smart investment when you need a replacement vehicle. While new car purchases tend to increase with a rising economy, used cars can provide a great alternative as long as you know how to shop for one.

Failing to Line up Financing Before Shopping

Before you purchase your used car, whether that’s through a dealer or from a private owner on a website such as Craigslist, you’ll have to figure out how you’re going to pay for it. Not everyone is able to lay down the cash for a car in full—even for a used one

Financing allows you to understand the upper limit of your price range. Knowing your budget makes negotiating prices easier. If you’re buying a car from a dealership, you can certainly take their offer. But remember, dealer financing is built like a wholesale insurance offer, often adding in additional interest rates.

Shopping Based on Monthly Payments Alone

You can save a lot over the long term if you have enough money to buy your used car outright. If you don’t fall into this category, you’ll have to make up a budget and determine how much you can afford

When people look for a new car, they often think about the monthly payments they’ll have to make. While a lower monthly payment is good for your monthly budget, a longer payment period means you end up paying back more money in the long run. Due to compounding interest, it could make more sense for you to take on a higher monthly payment since it’s possible to pay back the principle in a shorter period.

Choosing the Best Car Dealer

Buying a new car, truck, or SUV can often be a time-consuming and quite overwhelming process. Even when you do some digging, choosing a manufacturer, and set your sight on a few models, there is still a lot of things to be done. Finding and choosing the right car dealership means that you will need to do more than simply typing “best car dealers” into your search box. In this article, you will be able to read about a few steps that you should take when looking for a good car dealer

Read the Reviews on the Dealer Website

Reading the reviews from customers can provide you with a good idea of the overall dealership quality. They will certainly provide insight into how the dealership communicates with its customers, what services they offer, as well as the cost of the services they provide. You should check the dealers’ websites and read reviews from customers just like you.

Dealer Longevity

Selling vehicles is not an easy thing to do and dealerships come and go, just like every other business. This is especially true for car dealers who opened their doors for the first time less than a year ago. Will the dealer be there in the future when you need help? It is usually smarter and safer to buy a vehicle from a well-established dealer who has been around for a lot of years

Check Better Business Bureau

You should check the Better Business Bureau or BBB website for your state. The BBB keeps various records about customer complaints for up to 36 months and the records might show you if the complaint that a customer filed was solved according to the BBB policies. Comparing several car dealers in the same area can quickly reveal if there are any trouble spots.

Facilities

According to the experts from autonkauf-mikael.de, how a dealership cares about their facilities can tell you a lot about them. The best dealers will take pride in their showroom and facilities. You should look around when you arrive there. Are the facilities orderly, clean, and in good shape? Are all the cars there clean? Take these things into consideration when choosing a car dealership